Scroll down to read descriptions of the engineering courses offered at Carthage, or click on these links for additional resources:

Computational Reasoning with MATLAB

EGR 1020 / 2 credits
Computational Reasoning with MATLAB is an introductory course focused on learning the processes of exploring systems and data analytically as a means to draw data-informed conclusions and recommendations. This course will draw from topics of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to inform modeling of simple systems. Students will work in small groups as they learn to break down complex systems into simpler constituents which can be approximated as analytical models in the MATLAB scripting environment. Within this course, students will focus on problems related to mathematical, scientific, and engineering problems while learning to use MATLAB to script, analyze data, and present and communicate results. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: None

Introduction to Engineering Design

EGR 1100 / 4 credits
This course introduces students to engineering as a professional discipline rooted in problem identification and solving. The course focuses in one or more areas drawn from the domains of energy, transportation, environment, consumer technology, health, and exploration. Through this course, students are introduced to the principles of identifying engineering opportunities, benchmarking existing solutions, and reverse engineering. Through their analysis of reverse engineered products, students’ explore engineering and manufacturing decisions, sustainability principles, and engineering ethics. Students present their work throughout the course informing each other of their findings as they explore existing engineered products. The course incorporates key aspects of professional engineering in which critical thinking, teamwork, and creativity are essential attributes of the successful practitioner.
Prerequisites: None

Visualization & Modeling

EGR 1200 / 2 credits
This is a course about communicating design ideas through modeling, visualization, and prototyping. Students learn to create value through the representation and communication of engineering design ideas with computer aided drafting and rapid prototyping. Students will begin with foundational elements of dimensions, sketching, and projecting. Students will learn to transition design ideas into computer aided drafting software, and recognizing that designs change and new information is learned, students will learn to model their design ideas using parametric modeling techniques to account for design intent. Modeling in computer-aided drafting software will be used as an entry point into the fundamentals of rapid manufacturing. The course will culminate in a project where students apply both modeling and rapid manufacturing to communicate design ideas. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: None

Managing Engineering Ventures

EGR 1300 / 2 credits
This is a course on entrepreneurial thinking, the development of engineered solutions, and the effective management of the organizations and processes supporting such work. In this practice-based course, students learn to create value through practice of managing an engineering project with an engineering team. Students will explore, apply, and compare processes of agile management, including Strategic Doing and SCRUM as well as traditional project management approaches by identifying project requirements, developing a work breakdown structure and network diagram, and formulating a project schedule. These skills and processes reflect those currently used in active engineering firms, both established and startups.
Prerequisites: None

Engineering Practice I

EGR 2700 / 4 credits
This course is the first in a sequence about exploring and evaluating opportunities to solve a real problem with real stakeholders. Through this course, students will learn about the engineering design process with a focus on early-stage engineering design: understanding and detailing customer requirements, describing engineering problems functionally, exploring the engineering solutions space, ideating potential design solutions, and analyzing potential design options. Students will work with a real client through this course with a goal of delivering a final design solution. This course includes significant team and project-based components and provides an introduction to interpersonal communication skills that lead to effective problem solving, idea generation, and decision making.
Prerequisites: EGR 1100 and EGR 1020

Engineering Practice II 

EGR 2710 / 4 credits
This course is the second in a sequence about exploring and evaluating opportunities to solve a real problem with real stakeholders. Through this course, students will learn about the engineering design process with a focus on late-stage engineering design: embodiment, modeling and prototyping, and testing and refinement of design solutions. Students will work with a real client through this course with a goal of delivering a final design solution. This course includes significant team and project-based components and provides an introduction to interpersonal communication skills that lead to effective problem solving, idea generation, and decision making.
Prerequisites: EGR 2710 (or permission of instructor) and EGR 1200 or EGR 1300

Statics and Solid Mechanics

EGR 2100 / 4 credits
Statics and Solid Mechanics examines force systems under equilibrium conditions; vector properties of forces, moments, couples, and resultants; rigid body structures; hydrostatics; shear and bending-moment diagrams; friction; centroids; area/mass moments of inertia. The course uses graphical, algebraic, and numerical (computer) methods to solve the vector mechanics problems posed by static equilibrium. The mechanics of deformable bodies, and the effects of externally applied loads on materials, are also studied. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes measurement of the mechanical properties of engineering materials with modern hardware and software tools. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: PHY 2200 and MTH 1220 or permission of instructor

Engineering Materials

EGR 3100 / 4 credits
Engineering Materials examines the nature, physical behavior, and design applications of materials. The structure-property relationships of metals, ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors are studied, and their physical properties are understood as arising directly from their atomic/molecular structure. Materials selection to match design requirements to desired attributes is also introduced. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes measurement of the properties of engineering materials with modern hardware and software tools. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: EGR 2100 and CHM 1010. Concurrent enrollment in MTH 2020 or permission of the instructor.

Electronics

EGR 3120 / 4 credits
Introduction to analog and digital circuits. Topics include passive and active analog electronic components, DC and AC circuit analysis, amplifiers, filters, binary and digital systems, logic gates, and microcontroller programming.
Prerequisite: PHY 2110 or 2210, or departmental approval

Senior Capstone Project

EGR 4900 / 4 credits
This course requires students to carry out a culminating project within an engineering context. Students engage in a formal design experience that starts with design requirements, proceeds to idea generation for design, then prototyping and testing, concluding with a comprehensive written report and oral presentation. Senior Capstone is intended to aid students in consolidating content knowledge acquired in earlier parts of the engineering curriculum with technical skills needed to execute a full design project.
Prerequisites: EGR 3100 and senior standing, or permission of the instructor.