The View from an Artist: Blog Entries

  • Carthage Wind Orchestra Students

    A Spring Journey

    There is a sense of familiarity that comes with performing in an ensemble. From the conversations before rehearsals to the dinners after performances, there is plenty of time to bond as both musicians and as friends. This bonding not only improves the enjoyment of performing, but can improve the musicality of the ensemble, as members are more willing to communicate and work together as they play. While regular concerts and rehearsals help the ensemble grow together over time, a tour can dramatically heighten the musical and social familiarity between the musicians. Even as a temporary member of the ensemble, a tour thrusts you into the middle of an ensemble’s traditions and quirks as you play concert after concert. Over this past spring break, I was able to immerse myself in the Wind Orchestra as we performed in Arizona during our tour “A Lenten Journey”

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  • Azniv Khaligian ?22

    A Conversation with the 2020 Concerto Competition Winner Azniv Khaligian ’22

    At Carthage, student musicians can compete for the opportunity to perform with the Carthage Philharmonic in the annual Concerto Competition. The works are often technically demanding and the collaboration with a large ensemble often forces musicians out of their comfort zones. Azniv Khaligian ’22 won the competition back in 2020, but due to COVID-19 pandemic the concert was canceled. This month, Azniv will be able to showcase her dedication as a musician with a performance of Ralph Vaughan Williams’ The Lark Ascending with the Philharmonic! Leading up to the concert, I sat down with Azniv to discuss the preparation for this performance, her experiences with the new violin faculty, and her plans for the future.

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  • Cassidy Skorija ?19, Associate Director of Development and Institutional Giving at Milwaukee Repe...

    Cassidy Skorija ’19 Instrumental in Earning Arts Midwest Funding for Milwaukee Repertory Theater

    In her position as Associate Director of Development and Institutional Giving at Milwaukee Repertory Theater, alumni and former employee of Carthage’s Office of Performing & Visual Arts Cassidy Skorija ’19 has helped Milwaukee Rep earn funding from Arts Midwest’s Shakespeare in American Communities program to support Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s production of As You Like It and their Reading Residency program. The Reading Residency program gives 7th - 9th grade Milwaukee students the opportunity to experience Shakespeare’s work both in their schools and performed live. While on campus, Cassidy assisted in growing our Performing Arts Series into the amazing selection of performances that it is today. I spoke with Cassidy about her grant, her time at Carthage, and the steps she took towards creating an Art Series that has touched the lives of many Carthage students.

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  • Bridge and Wolak

    Bridge and Wolak: Inspiration and Motivation in the Fine Arts

    Carthage’s Performing Arts Series, in support by the Racine Community Foundation, continues its 25th anniversary with a concert by musicians and comedians Bridge and Wolak. Bridge and Wolak are a dynamic duo that teach and perform to audiences around the world. Musical education is a difficult but rewarding field that pushes you to become your own motivator while also giving you the opportunity to receive inspiration from artists and coworkers. I spoke with Kornel Wolak about his journey in the music industry, an average day on tour, and what inspires him to perform.

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  • Caitlin Preuss ‘23 as Amalia Balash in She Loves Me

    Being Amalia Balash: A reflection on “She Loves Me”

    Balash. Amalia Balash.  The first time I received my script for “She Loves Me” and read that ever-famous line, I had no idea the impact that such a name would have on me as a performer, and as a person. Every fall, students in the Music Theatre Workshop course put on a full length musical in a blackbox style space. We work on character development, production standards, and simply gaining the ability to do a full length show.

    When it was announced that the fall course would be performing “She Loves Me”, I was happy, but not particularly jazzed.  The style of music that is prevalent in She Loves Me is not my usual strength, but I was ready to be involved in any way shape or form. I was surprised and a bit terrified however, when the cast list said my name next to the leading role.

    Read  “Being Amalia Balash: A reflection on “She Loves Me””