Skip to main content

International Political Economy

Courses

Students studying IPE at Carthage will take courses in international relations, international trade and finance, international management, microeconomics, macroeconomics, political science, statistics, law, accounting and geography. 

Students take courses in Economics, Geospatial Science, Political Science, Management, Marketing, Finance, and Modern Languages. Scroll down to read descriptions of the IPE courses offered at Carthage, or click on the following links for additional resources.

 

Economics Courses

ECN 1030
Issues in Economics (SOC)
4 credits

This course offers students an introduction to economics, along with some elementary tools of economic analysis, with emphasis upon their application to contemporary problems and issues. The economy and selected issues are examined in their global context. Designed to meet the needs and interests of students in various majors outside of the economics and business administration areas, the course is not open to students who have received credit for either ECN 1010 or ECN 1020. Fall.

ECN/BUS 2340
Applied Statistics for Management and Economics (MTH)
4 credits

The application of statistics to problems in business and economics, encompassing the gathering, organization, analysis, and presentation of data. Topics include descriptive statistics in tabular and graphical forms; the common measures of central tendency and dispersion; sampling and probability distributions; construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; and correlation analysis. This course is offered as BUS 2340 or ECN 2340. Fall/Spring.

ECN 2510
Intermediate Microeconomics (SOC)
4 credits

The economic theory of microeconomic units: consumers, firms, and industries. This entails the study of production, cost, and price theory, and the practices of firms under alternative market structures. Concepts of social welfare will be explored, and the uses and limits of public policy in addressing the problems of market failures will be examined. Prerequisite: ECN 1010 or 1030. Fall.

ECN 2520
Intermediate Macroeconomics (SOC)
4 credits

The economic theory of macroeconomic aggregates: national income accounting; the determinants of output, income, and employment levels; the analysis of inflation; processes of economic growth; and open-economy macroeconomics. Monetary, fiscal, and incomes policies are examined and the uses and limits of these tools in promoting macroeconomic goals are discussed. Prerequisite: ECN 1020 or 1030. Spring.

ECN 3270
International Trade (SOC)
4 credits

An historical and theoretical analysis of international economic relations in both public and private spheres. Using the principles of economic analysis, models of international trade and factor prices, commercial policy, and economic integration are set forth and become a basis for examining policy issues. Prerequisite: ECN 1010 and 1020, or 1030. Fall.

ECN 3290
International Finance
4 credits

This course examines the monetary side of international economics and globalization, including the current and historical structure of international finance institutions. Topics include exchange rate theories, monetary regimes, interest rates, asset pricing, and risk diversification, the balance of payments, currency crises, and open-economy aspects of fiscal and monetary policies. Emphasis is given to the use of theories in understanding current events and policy issues. Prerequisites: ECN 1010 and 1020, or ECN 1030. Spring.

ECN 3300
Law and Economics (SOC)
4 credits

An examination of how economic concepts and modeling can be applied to help determine the justification for, and the effects of, various types of laws and contractual arrangements. The problems posed by externalities and other market failure arising in resource, labor, and product markets are discussed, and the legal framework and regulatory environment for addressing these issues is surveyed in order that alternative approaches might be evaluated. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

ECN 4030
International Political Economy (SOC)
4 credits

Building upon prior analysis of international trade and finance, this course offers students an advanced study of the interaction of the economic and political processes in the world arena. Topics may include, but are not limited to, economic and political integration, theories of direct foreign investment and international production, economic development, the political economy of the global environment and international governance. Spring.

ECN 4050
Seminar in International Political Economy
4 credits

Serving as a capstone for the International Political Economy major, the seminar goes beyond disciplinary lines in an attempt to further integrate diverse and often competing perspectives, methodologies, and values. A research thesis, on a topic of individual student’s choice made in consultation with an advisor, is required along with an oral presentation to faculty and students involved in the program. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Spring.

Political Science Courses 

POL 1050
Introduction to International Relations
4 credits

This course offers an introduction to the major concepts and theories in international politics and their application to the events of the postwar world, particularly the Cold War and the North-South conflict. Attention is also given to disruptive forces in the international community, such as the nuclear arms race and ethnic conflict, as well as those forces, such as the United Nations, that contribute to world order. Fall.

POL 200T
Topics in Political Science
1-4 credits

This course covers selected topics such as jurisprudence, international law, women and politics, U.S. foreign policy in Central America, art and politics, politics of developing areas, political socialization, the Presidency, criminal justice and internal security. The course content will determine in which area credit will be given.

POL 2050
Philosophical Foundations of Political Economy
4 credits

An introduction to the philosophical foundations of political economy from classical times through the Enlightenment and to the modern era. Students will read, discuss, and analyze the works of both European political economists (Smith, Ricardo, Mill, and Marx) and American thinkers and statesmen in the field (Jefferson, Mason, Hamilton, and Madison). Fall.

POL 4050
Seminar in International Political Economy
4 credits

Serving as a capstone for the International Political Economy major, the seminar goes beyond disciplinary lines in an attempt to further integrate diverse and often competing perspectives, methodologies, and values. A research thesis, on a topic of the individual student’s choice made in consultation with an advisor, is required along with an oral presentation to faculty and students involved in the program. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Management Courses

MGT 3710
International Management
4 credits

A study of management in an international environment, its evolution, and its position in today’s society. Students also study the control and decision-making process for management of a worldwide organization, including the financial, marketing, human resource, political and ethical implications of the worldwide organization in local markets and in the international community. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Spring.

MGT 3730
International Legal Environment of Business
4 credits

A survey of various legal systems including common law, civil law, and Islamic law. Students will be introduced to a variety of concepts, including the sources of international law, the distinction between private and public law, and the concept of sovereign nations. The implications of sovereignty as they relate to international business activity are a central theme of the course. Original source materials, case studies, and legal opinions are used. Special schedule. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Modern Language Courses

FRN 3080
The French-Speaking World: Social, Political, and Economic Issues (HUM)
4 credits

Students will learn about social, political, and economic issues affecting the French-speaking world using a variety of media and texts. Issues will be contextualized in the contemporary world, and examination of their historical background will further students’ understanding of these issues in their cultural context. Prerequisite: FRN 3010 and FRNL 3010 or consent of instructor. Alternate Fall Semesters.

GRM 3080
The German-Speaking World: Social, Political, and Economic Issues (HUM)
4 credits

Students will learn about social, political, and economic issues affecting the German-speaking world using a variety of media and texts. Issues will be discussed within the context of the contemporary world, and examination of their historical background will further students’ understanding of these issues in their cultural context. Prerequisite: GRM 3010 and GRML 3010 or consent of instructor. Alternative Fall Semesters.

SPN 3080
The Spanish-Speaking World: Social, Political, and Economic Issues (HUM)
4 credits

Students will learn about social, political, and economic issues affecting the Spanish-speaking world using a variety of media and texts. Issues will be discussed within the context of the contemporary world, and examination of the historical background will further students’ understanding of these issues in their cultural context. Prerequisite: SPN 3010 and SPNL 3010 or consent of instructor.

Geospatial Science Courses

GEO 1500
Human Geography: An Introduction (SOC)
4 credits

An examination of the evolution of concepts concerning the nature, scope, and methods of Human Geography (population, economic, urban, landscape, etc.) with emphasis on current geographic thought, theory, research themes, and the relationship between people and the environment. Alternate Springs.

GEO 1600
Earth Revealed (NLAB)
4 credits

Earth Revealed examines the earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere, studying the spatial patterns of phenomena at a variety of scales. The course is taught in a studio classroom setting, with lecture/discussion and computer-based analysis of satellite imagery. Environmental issues and sustainability are an integral part of the class. Fall/Spring.

GEO 1610
Introduction to Geographic Information Science: Mapping Your World
4 credits

This course provides an introduction to portraying spatial data and making data maps for a variety of applications. Students work in a hands-on lab/lecture setting while exploring computer mapping production techniques; cartographic design; communication properties of thematic maps; data selection and quality; and the problems of graphic display in print and electronic formats. Students will apply the course material by completing a variety of mapping projects. Students need no specialized computer skills to enter the course, but they will be expected to manipulate data and maps using the computer methods discussed in class. Fall/Spring.

  • Quick Facts

    • Carthage is named a Best Midwestern College by The Princeton Review (2019), a designation given to only 25 percent of four-year schools.

    • The Tower, Carthage’s newest residence hall, provides some of the best views on campus — if not in the Midwest! In addition to #carthageviews of the lake from seven stories up, residents enjoy suite-style living and two floors of shared campus spaces for gaming, cooking, group meetings, or quiet studying. Learn more about all housing options.

    • You’re going to need brain fuel. Grab a morning coffee and a snack and Starbucks or Einstein Bros. Bagels. Later, meet friends at “The Caf,” where the specials change daily but the staples are constant, or swing through “The Stu” for wings, a burrito, or a sub. A new option, Carthage Cash, even covers some off-campus meals.

    • 96% of Carthage alumni report that they have secured a job or are continuing their studies six months after graduation. Visit Career Services.

    • 91% of employers say critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills matter more than your major when it comes to career success. Learn more about how the liberal arts prepare you for a successful career.

    • Lots of schools wear the four-year label. Carthage stands behind it. 95% of Carthage graduates earn their degrees in four years. Learn more

    • Oscars. Emmys. Tonys. Golden Globes. The playwrights we’ve brought in have them. Each year, the Carthage Theatre Department commissions an original script by a renowned playwright for its New Play Initiative. Carthage students then work with the writer to stage it. 

    • Carthage’s J-Term offers IPE students opportunities to study business culture in other countries. Recent J-Term study tours have been led by economics, finance, political science, and marketing faculty to such destinations as Sweden, Cuba, Argentina, southern Africa, and Hong Kong.

    • Carthage IPE graduates are working around the globe as computer analysts, financial advisors, investment brokers, international business analysts, mutual fund specialists, and for government and nonprofit organizations. 

    • Popular with IPE students, the student organization Enactus provides students with entrepreneurial experience through community projects. The group’s name borrows from three words: entrepreneurial, action, and us. Enactus has received regional and national recognition.

    • Carthage has been named a top producer of Fulbright Fellows three years running: 2015-2016, 2016-2017, and 2017-2018. Read about Carthage Fulbright winners.

    • Things look new at Carthage because they are. Our science center, student union, athletic and recreation center, and numerous residence halls have all been constructed or newly renovated in the last 15 years.

    • Carthage offers majors, minors and concentrations in more than 50 areas of study, from archaeology to neuroscience, nursing to music theatre.

    • Our Summer Undergraduate Research Experience offers select students a research budget, one-on-one mentoring with a professor, and 10 weeks of analyzing, deciphering — and getting paid.

    • So the lake is kind of a focal point, but there’s a lot more to love about our campus — like the fact that our more than 80-acre campus is also an arboretum and wildlife sanctuary. Focused on keeping campus lush forever, we plant between 50 and 75 new trees every year from a variety of species.

    • Carthage was founded in 1847. That’s more than 170 years of leaders, makers, and go-getters going out and going forth. Read more about Carthage’s rich history.

    • More than 90 percent of students receive financial aid. Carthage awards more than $20 million in scholarship and grant assistance. That includes $1.5 million in competitive scholarships in business, mathematics, science, languages, the fine arts, leadership, and overall academic strength. Learn what’s available.

    • Abraham Lincoln was an early Trustee of the College, and U.S. Secretary of State John Hay was a Carthage alum. The two still have a proud place on our campus. Spend some time with them in our Sesquicentennial Plaza. On warm days you’ll find professors leading their classes here.

    • Come to Carthage; hear yourself think — think … think …
      Legend has it that Sesquicentennial Plaza holds a perfect echo. Just stand with both your feet on the “1847,” face Straz, and start talking. “You’re the only one who can hear you, but you’ll be crystal clear,” promises English and theatre alumna Mikaley Osley.

    • Our Great Lake provides Carthage students with some amazing views. Think classes on the beach, lake views from the lab, and sunrises from your dorm room. “I love waking up in the morning with the sun shining off the lake. Nothing compares to the view in the morning,” recalls biology and neuroscience major Ann O’Leary.

    • Carthage awards up to 35 Presidential Scholarships each year, which range from 75% tuition up to full tuition, room, and board. Learn more.

    • For a full decade, NASA has selected Carthage students to conduct research aboard its zero-gravity aircraft. Lately, the stakes have risen. A team of underclassmen is grinding to prepare a tiny but powerful Earth-imaging satellite for launch to the International Space Station. Learn more about the space sciences at Carthage

    • Carthage is the only college or university in the Midwest where every freshman takes a full-year sequence of foundational texts of the Western intellectual tradition. Learn about the Carthage core.

    • With a student-faculty ratio of 12:1, your professors will know who you are. They will also know who you want to be — and how to get you there. Meet our faculty.

    • There are more than 120 student organizations on campus, from Amnesty International to Fencing to Frisbee, Chem Club to Stand Up Comedy. See how easy it is to get involved.

    • True story: There are more than 27 art galleries, a dozen museums, and nine theatres within 25 miles of Carthage. Some highlights: The nationally recognized Racine Art Museum, the world-renowned Art Institute of Chicago, and the Milwaukee Art Museum. Learn more about our location.

    • What’s better than one professor? Two professors. What’s better than two professors? Two professors from totally different fields teaching a single class. There’s debate. Discussion. Differing perspectives. This is where the magic happens. That’s why every student takes a Carthage Symposium.

    • You can’t hide here — not with only 17 other students in the classroom with you. That’s going to be rough some mornings. But later, when you’re able to argue your point of view thoughtfully, express your opinions succinctly, and meet challenges head-on, without fear … Yep, you’ll thank us.

    • Carthage is ranked No. 5 in the country for student participation in short-term study abroad. Every J-Term, hundreds of students travel all over the world on faculty-led study tours. Imagine a month in Sweden, Rome, Cuba, Senegal, India, Japan …

    Previous
    Next