Tommy Novak

Thomas Novak

Class Year

’11

Current home

Chicago, Ill.

Major(s)

Theatre Performance and Directing

Current Position

Freelance Actor and Teaching Artist

Carthage has prepared me for the real world by helping me become a well-rounded professional theater artist. Hard work, determination, and passion are key to being a successful theatrical artist. 

“I am currently working as an actor, wardrobe, and freelance teaching artist. I have acted with the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, First Stage Children’s Theater, The Marcus Center in Milwaukee, Two Lights, and the Utah Shakespeare Festival. I am a teaching artist for First Stage Theater Academy, The Utah Shakespeare Festival, and Broadway Bound Musical Theater Day camp. I am building an acting studio doing audition prep and monologue work for high school and up. Some of the workshops I teach for professional companies, schools, and for corporate events include Improvisation, Shakespeare, Musical theater, Stage Combat, Voice coaching (Estil), Animal Instinct of Acting, Audition Prep, and Arts integration Education. I plan on getting an MFA in Acting or Directing. I hope to be able to work as an actor/director and eventually become a faculty member on a college theater faculty or an artistic director of a theater company. We will see where this crazy world takes me. 

“My advice for current students would be to take the time to learn anything and everything. Once you’re out of school it’s harder to take the time to study or take classes post-college. Don’t just learn everything about one discipline in theater; find something else to specialize in. Theater is a collaborative art form and you never know when a play will call for something from another discipline.  If you are an actor, know what it’s like to work as a Technician. If you are a technician, see what it’s like to audition. Having knowledge of other areas will help you to respect other jobs in the theater. Overall, be a collaborative, hard-working, dedicated, and passionate artist. The more work you put into your craft, the more opportunities you will get out of it.”

“Take the time to learn anything and everything. Once you’re out of school it’s harder to take the time to study or take classes post-college.”

Thomas Novak, ’11