Timothy Knoepke

Class Year

’14

Hometown

Chippewa Falls, Wis.

Major(s)

Classical Archaeology

Timothy Knoepke came to Carthage from a rural farming area in Wisconsin, and no one expected him to major in classical archaeology. But his high school required freshmen to take at least one year of Latin. After that year was up, Timothy decided to continue studying it. “I fell in love with language and Roman people, and it directed me to continue on with my studies at Carthage,” he said. “I’ve never regretted my choice, no matter how tough the work may be some days.”

“I had the opportunity to work on two Roman archaeological excavations in Butrint, Albania, and Cinigiano, Italy. These internships allowed me to finally put some of my theory into practice and gain experience in the field of archaeology.”

Timothy Knoepke, ’14

Career goal

“To teach classics and Ancient history in Europe. I fell in love with Europe after studying abroad, and I plan to move back in the future.”

How have Carthage faculty had an impact on your life or Carthage career?

Joseph McAlhany. He has been my advisor over the past four years, and he has helped me find my place in the Classics. I would not have come to my current area of study if it was not for his guidance and support.” 

Favorite class

“Classical Mythology with Prof. McAlhany. Instead of using a textbook, we had the chance to study the actual ancient texts and develop a sense of Greek literature. It showed me a whole other side of the Classics, and changed the aim of my studies completely.”

Campus involvement

Carthage Swing Society, International Friendship Society, and Carthage Globetrotters.” 

Toughest class

“Historical Methods with Prof. Pullin. It has been tough to keep up with the workload at times, but it has been one of the most beneficial classes I have taken at Carthage. My research skills have drastically increased as a result. I only wish I had taken it sooner!”

Internships or on-campus employment

“I had the opportunity to work on two Roman archaeological excavations in Butrint, Albania, and Cinigiano, Italy. These internships allowed me to finally put some of my theory into practice and gain experience in the field of archaeology. In addition, I interned at the American Academy in Rome. I learned all about the preservation of archaeological objects, as well as research and library maintenance.”

Opportunities at Carthage

“Carthage has provided me with the opportunity to explore and pursue my interests. Through the SURE program I was able to spend an entire summer studying the writings of the Roman historian Livy. I was able to study the text in the original Latin and hone my skills with the language, while doing research that would eventually develop into my senior thesis.” 

Favorite moments and memories at Carthage

“The time I spent on campus during the summer for the SURE program. I had the chance to spend time with other dedicated and like-minded students, having discussions and working out the problems each of us had come across in our research.”

Favorite spot on campus

“My favorite place on campus? The basement of the library. There have been too many hours spent there to not have grown fond of it, in a love-hate sort of way.”

Biggest surprise so far

“Seeing how far I have come since my freshman year at Carthage. I almost wouldn’t recognize myself if I saw my freshman self, as I have matured so much over the past four years through my studies.”

What would your 8-year-old self think of you now?

“My 8-year-old self would be surprised, yet proud. Coming from a rural farming area of Wisconsin, I chose a career path that most people in my area have never even heard of. I simply followed my dreams and never let anything discourage me.” 

Why should other students consider your major? What advice do you have for them?

“Be willing to dedicate yourself to the study of the Classics. The literature opens a window into the minds of the ancients and to understand the ancient world through their eyes. The initial work of studying Latin and Greek may be difficult and time-consuming, but once you finally have a grasp of the languages and material culture, the sky is the limit. A study of the Classics can lead you into so many different fields of study and to many far-off places.”