Joe Guardiola

Class Year

’16

Hometown

Racine, Wis.

Major(s)

Computer Science

Minor(s)

Mathematics

Joe Guardiola came to Carthage because he wanted a quality education at a private school. “Coming from a private high school, I valued small classrooms, and I wanted to have a similar environment in college,” he said. Because of the small class sizes, Joe has been able to connect with his professors, both in and out of the classroom. “All of my professors have been very respectful and understanding, and they have all been willing to take extra time to meet with me outside of class to help me learn difficult concepts, or to talk about careers in their area of study.”

Joe is majoring in computer science and is excited to start working in a growing field with high rates of employment and an upper level salary. “It is the major of the future,” he said.

“Four words: Do not give up! Two years ago, I had no idea how to program in any language and now I know six computer languages.Talk to the professor. If your professor is too busy, try talking to your classmates. Believe it or not, those seemingly genius programmers can probably help you learn as well.”

Joe Guardiola, ’16

Career goal

“I hope to be a software developer, creating mobile applications for a Fortune 500 company.”

How have Carthage faculty had an impact on your life or Carthage career?

Professor Mahoney is the chair of the Computer Science Department and my Carthage advisor. He has been a huge help in my educational and career goals. He has truly helped me stay motivated and excited to seek out opportunities and reach academic goals. Often times I have grown frustrated while creating a computer program, but Prof. Mahoney has always gone out of his way to help me successfully finish the project.”

Favorite class

“My favorite class at Carthage thus far is Data Structures and Algorithms. It was by far the most challenging class I have taken at Carthage, and the challenge is what made it my favorite class. Every project I finished in that class gave me an overwhelming feeling of accomplishment and confidence in my programming skills.”

Campus involvement

“I am the vice president of the Computer Science Club at Carthage College. I try to plan fun and educational events for club members to learn more about programming. It has been a great opportunity to share programming knowledge among peers and have plenty of fun along the way.”

Toughest class

Data Structures and Algorithms is the most difficult class I have taken at Carthage. This class was so challenging because it was the first upper-level computer science class I had to take after only introductory computer science experience.”

Internships or on-campus employment

“I have an internship at Modine Heating & Cooling in Racine. It has been a valuable experience thus far, allowing me to apply the skills I have learned in class to solve real world problems.”

Favorite moments and memories at Carthage

“My favorite Carthage moment would be attending the Carthage Relay for Life Event. It was a friendly group of people all meeting to raise money for cancer. It was awesome to see a bunch of poor college kids raise and donate enough money to blow the Carthage goal out of the water.”

Favorite spot on campus

“I can most often be found sitting somewhere by Starbucks. There’s coffee and some mingling people, but it is not overly loud. Thus it is the perfect place to both hang out with friends and study, at least in my humble opinion.”

Biggest surprise so far

“The awesome professors. I am sure we have all heard horror stories about terrible, unfair, even evil college professors. Some of those stories may be true, but apparently not at Carthage. All of my professors have been very respectful and understanding. Furthermore they have all been willing to take extra time to meet with me outside of class. Sometimes this was to help me learn difficult concepts or to talk about careers in their area of study. These professors are certainly not evil.”

What would your 8-year-old self think of you now?

“8-year-old me would probably be pretty surprised. When I was an 8-year-old, my dream career was to be a paleontologist. I was just a kid who wanted to be around dinosaurs, and I think that kid version of me would be surprised to hear I jumped from digging up bones to typing up computer software.”

Why should other students consider your major? What advice do you have for them?

“Four words: Do not give up! I am not an expert in computer science just yet, but I have done enough programming to know that it is difficult. Two years ago, I had no idea how to program in any language, and now I know six computer languages. If you think making phone apps, websites, and computer programs is awesome, pursue computer science headstrong. Even if it seems too difficult or confusing, don’t give up. Talk to the professor. If your professor is too busy, try talking to your classmates. Believe it or not, those seemingly genius programmers can probably help you learn as well.”