Amanda Reilly

Class Year

’16

Hometown

Tuscon, Arizona

Major(s)

Classics and History

Minor(s)

Great Ideas

The amazing location, breathtaking scenery, and a desire to see some snow drew Amanda Reilly to Carthage from her home in Tucson, Arizona.

“Carthage immediately drew my attention,” she said. “I absolutely love it here and wouldn’t change my choice for the world.”

Amanda is a double major in classics and history with hopes to either attend law school or enroll in a graduate program centered on Shamanistic studies.

“The beauty behind classics is the diversity of options that one has after graduation,” she said. “[The program] is known to strengthen skills in analysis, critical thinking, writing, and verbal understanding. I truly believe classics is the most beneficial of the interdisciplinary studies, and a true depiction of the liberal arts program.”

Not only has Carthage pushed Amanda academically, she is also involved in extracurricular activities on campus, has an on-campus job, and has made some favorite memories here.

“Some of my favorite memories at Carthage have been my firsts: The first time I climbed a tree (being from Arizona there aren’t many good trees to climb that won’t hurt you), my first time sledding, and my first snowball fight. Being able to share all of these with my close friends is more than I could have possibly asked for.”

“Carthage immediately drew my attention. I absolutely love it here and wouldn’t change my choice for the world.”

Amanda Reilly, ’16

Career goal

“After graduating from Carthage, my goal is to either attend law school or enroll in a graduate program centered on Shamanistic studies. If I attend law school, my long-term goal would be to become an attorney and work toward making the private ownership of vertebrate fossils illegal. Private ownership is not only greatly immoral, but it also significantly hinders the ability for paleontologists to carry out research and contribute to the overall understanding of prehistoric time.”

How have Carthage faculty had an impact on your life or Carthage career?

“I simply cannot pick out a few professors who have helped me. I’ve made a connection to every professor that I have had. A few, for example, have been Eric Pullin, Michael McShane, Seemee Ali, Charlotte Chell, Dan Schowalter, Michael Phegley, and Stephen Udry, but the list goes on and on. I even have relationships with professors who I’ve never had a class with before! It’s just another amazing benefit of being a student at a liberal arts school.”

Favorite class

“There have been so many fun classes that I’ve taken. It is so hard to narrow it down, but if I had to choose, my favorites would be my first semester of Western Heritage, Nuclear Proliferation, Dinosaur Evolution and Extinction, American History, and Roman Religions. It was a combination of the professors and the topics the courses covered that made them my favorites. The way that these classes challenged me have changed who I am, not only as a student, but in the way I think.”

Campus involvement

“I have had some awesome extracurricular experiences with Carthage. I’ve been involved with Alpha Lambda Delta, Mock Trial, Philosophy Club, National Residence Hall Honorary (NRHH), and, of course, my sorority Alpha Chi Omega.

“I’ve also had a few jobs while at Carthage. My first job was working at World of Wings, where I worked for a little under two years. Then, after going to the rock wall on a regular basis my freshman year, I was offered a job there and it has been such a blast. I highly recommend everyone going to the wall at least once before graduating! It’s a wonderful exercise and a great way to relieve stress.

“I also work in the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies Office and in the Archives. The summer before my junior year, I was able to work as a student ambassador and give tours to soon-to-be Carthage students.

“One of the coolest of all my jobs, though, is being an elephant wrangler for the Hannibal Lectures. Being an elephant wrangler means I get to help with guest lecturers who come to Carthage. I’ve been able to meet so many interesting people and have some quiet, unique conversations. Once again I highly recommend that students try to attend at least one Hannibal Lecture before graduating. The topics the speakers present on go above and beyond the classroom. It is an hour well spent!”

Toughest class

“My toughest class by far was Nuclear Proliferation taught by Prof. Roberg. I took this class to cover my social science requirement. My good friend warned me about how challenging Prof. Roberg was, so I knew going in that it wouldn’t be easy. Regardless, this is definitely in my top three favorite classes. The reason why it was particularly challenging for me was because it is a class listed under the political science major and I had never taken a class in that department before. It challenged me to think in a different way, and after taking the class, I have been able to apply this style of thinking to more of my recent classes, which has helped me immensely.”

Favorite moments and memories at Carthage

“Some of my favorite memories at Carthage have been all of my firsts: The first time I climbed a tree (being from Arizona, there aren’t many good trees to climb that won’t hurt you), my first time sledding, and my first snowball fight. Being able to share all of these with my close friends is more than I could have possibly asked for.”

Favorite spot on campus

“My favorite spot on campus is this little area behind the Todd Wehr Center. There is a cute little flower patch and a giant stone that I like to sit on and do homework, look at the lake, or just take a break from the day. It is always so quiet and serene. I’m surprised more people don’t hang out around there.”

Biggest surprise so far

“I was a little worried coming to Carthage because of the Lutheran affiliation. I come from a strong Jewish background and didn’t know what to expect on my first day. I actually had a terrifying dream the night before my first class that my teacher chased me around the classroom with a ruler because I couldn’t quote sections of the Bible. Ridiculous, I know, but when I woke up and was getting ready for my first college class, I couldn’t help but be anxious. My nerves kept on building, but when I walked into the classroom, instead of seeing what I was expecting, I saw a man chewing on a cigar wearing a yarmulke, telling the punch line to some ridiculous joke. I literally laughed out loud at myself for being so worried and sat down with such a huge grin. Prof. Pullin must have thought I was insane.”

What would your 8-year-old self think of you now?

“My 8-year-old self probably wouldn’t be too happy with my current path. I was dead set on becoming a space pirate back then, but I would hope that even though I have put the dreams of piracy aside, my 8-year-old-self would be happy of the fact that I am quite active out on the field with archaeological and paleontological work, instead of being cooped up in an office all day long.”

Why should other students consider your major? What advice do you have for them?

“A common doubt a lot of people have when considering a classics or history major is about what they will do with it once they graduate. My response to that is if you want to be a billionaire, don’t major in classics or history. If you don’t know what you want to do and enjoy the atmosphere of academia, there is nothing better than interdisciplinary or liberal art studies. If you are unsure of what you want to do in the future, why not get a unique and diverse understanding of the foundations of humanity? Doing so is simply putting your foot in the door for graduate schools, or even medical and law schools.”