Carman Anderson

Class Year

’12

Hometown

Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

Major(s)

Great Ideas, Classics

Minor(s)

Studio Art, Political Theory

Carman Anderson had never heard of Carthage until a friend mentioned it to her. But from the moment she stepped on campus she fell in love with the atmosphere, professors and students here. Now Carman is taking every opportunity that comes her way. Not only is she double majoring in Great Ideas and Classics, she is also a studio art and political theory minor. Something unique about the political theory minor is that Carman self-designed it. 

Carman’s academic commitment doesn’t stop there. She is a member of the honors fraternity Alpha Lambda Delta, the political science fraternity Pi Sigma Alpha and is vice-president of the classics fraternity Eta Sigma Phi. In her free time, Carman is part of the Fencing Club, the Philosophy Club, and Relay for Life. She has also taken advantage of research opportunities, interesting J-Term classes, and the Hannibal Lecture Series.

When she started at Carthage, Carman planned to major in one of the natural sciences. Then she took Western Heritage, a course all freshman are required to take. “I really felt involved with the texts that we were reading, and I felt that I could see myself doing that type of work for the rest of my college career,” she said.

The Great Ideas major made Carman feel at home. The major allows students to look at all the different angles and foundations of where western civilization originated. “The thinking allows me to delve more into what it is that I believe is important to think about,” Carman said.

Both the subject matter and the people involved in the Great Ideas major are welcoming. “Everyone — students and professors alike — is willing to hear what everyone else has to say,” she said.

Carman plans to attend graduate school to study Classical studies. Eventually she would like to teach at the college level.

“I did not expect to gain such great relationships with the faculty and staff at Carthage.”

Carman Anderson, ’12

How have Carthage faculty had an impact on your life or Carthage career?

“Dr. McAlhany is my favorite professor. I go into his classes feeling like I have not prepared enough, and I am sometimes proven right, but then the discussions that he brings into the class make me want to completely revisit whatever it was that we were talking about. He has taught me to try and think more clearly about what it is that I find most interesting.”

Favorite class

“It’s a tie between It’s About Time with Dr. McAlhany and Dr. Klyve and Classical Mythology, also with Dr. McAlhany. Both classes delved into the classical side of what the people in ancient civilizations thought about different things. However, I really liked that It’s About Time also moved into the modern interpretations of that same line of thinking. Both classes really became the deciding factor as to what it was that I wanted to study at Carthage.”

Toughest class

“My Contemporary Political Theory class with Dr. Kirkland was my toughest class. We had to read texts that I was not really that comfortable with and did not always understand. Even though the class was really difficult, it was still something that I really enjoyed because I was taught how to think and discuss things that I was not comfortable with.”

Favorite moments and memories at Carthage

“I have had some really wonderful conversations with friends and professors that have encouraged me to think about things that I would have never even thought of on my own. Also, I have had some really fun times around Kenosha with friends both from campus and from the area.”

Biggest surprise so far

“I did not expect to gain such great relationships with the faculty and staff at Carthage, while at the same time, having wonderful relationships with my fellow students.”

Why should other students consider your major? What advice do you have for them?

“My advice would be that you should be prepared to explain what it is that you are doing to everyone who asks, ‘What are you majoring in?’ You may not always be able to explain it to their full understanding, but you should be OK with that because it is something that you will love.”