Nycole Wenner

Class Year

’19

Hometown

Cold Spring, Minnesota

Major(s)

Physics

As a dedicated physics student, Nycole Wenner has experienced many great opportunities through Carthage, including the chance to build a satellite, travel to conferences across the country, and work with members of NASA.

By participating in the various J-Term courses offered at Carthage, Nycole has been able to experience classes and departments outside of her major that she would not have been able to otherwise. “I would have to say my favorite class was my J-Term class called Winter, Walking, and Writing that I took my sophomore year.” Through this class, Nycole and her classmates were able to walk around Lake Michigan and Kenosha in January, writing about what they saw. “It was incredibly relaxing and there was little stress.”

On campus, Nycole has participated in Carthage’s CubeSat and SURE programs where she served as head mechanical engineer learning computer programs and other essential skills.

Nycole encourages future physics students to “try both the engineering aspect and the research aspect” of the major. “It’s a very challenging and interesting field, but I love it.”

“Physics is an amazing and difficult field of study. Engineering is not the only path for physics! You can do so much more and create so many things. You can learn to manipulate and interpret the world around you and it’s so much fun!”

Nycole Wenner, ’19

Career goal

“I hope to go on to study astrophysics in graduate school and obtain a PhD in stellar astrophysics. After that, I want to study the stars.”

How have Carthage faculty had an impact on your life or Carthage career?

“There are so many professors that have impacted my life, but I would have to say Professor Daniel Steiner has impacted me the most. He’s a professor in the Physics Department and is the most kind and relaxed person I have ever met. He encourages students to do their best and pushes them to think in ways they normally wouldn’t. I have spent a lot of time talking to him about graduate school and life after college, and he has helped me not freak out as much about going into the real world. He’s incredibly friendly to everyone and he doesn’t judge you. I’m really happy to have a professor who understands and remembers what it’s like to be an undergraduate.”

Favorite class

“This is difficult, but I would have to say my favorite class was my J-Term class called Winter, Walking, and Writing that I took my sophomore year. The class was a simple, we would go on walks outside in the middle of January then write about them. It may sound lame, but we would walk in silence as a class around Kenosha and the lake and just take in the world around us, not worrying about anything else. It was incredibly relaxing and there was little stress. I’m glad I had the chance to take that class because I normally wouldn’t take a class like that in my major.”

Toughest class

“Electricity and Magnetism has been the bane of my existence. It’s very difficult because it’s the class in which you truly understand how difficult the field is becoming, no puns intended. It has a lot of abstract concepts and strange mathematics in it, and I know I’m not the only one struggling. But that’s just the course in and of itself, this stuff is hard even for people with PhDs.”

Opportunities at Carthage

“I was a part of the CubeSat program for two years, starting my first month here at Carthage my freshman year. I was the head mechanical engineer for two and a half years. I learned a lot about myself and my capabilities, and I traveled to conferences in Oregon and Wisconsin. I learned how to use computer programs and many other things they don’t teach you in class. I was also able to spend two summers working on it on campus as a student in the SURE program, starting the summer after my freshman year.”

“The wonderful thing about Carthage is that you can always get involved and there’s always something for you to join. I’ve had a wonderful experience with the professors and the students, learning with them how to do paperwork for the government and how to build things to survive in space. I’ve also gone to a lot of cool aerospace things in Wisconsin and have worked with people at NASA. This was one of the greatest life experiences I’ve ever had, and I’m glad I decided to do it.”

Favorite moments and memories at Carthage

“I have so many wonderful memories just walking along the lake with my friends. One of my favorite was the super blood moon my sophomore year. Everyone sat out on the beach and rocks to watch as the moon rose across Lake Michigan. Everyone was out, students, faculty, staff, the entire community, with lawn chairs, blankets, and the like. It was one of those special moments when you felt like you really belonged.”

Favorite spot on campus

“The planetarium, by far, is my favorite spot. I took a one credit class to learn how to use it and I have had access to it ever since. It’s quiet and we are allowed to give shows or even travel to different planets and distant galaxies. It’s in the beautiful David A. Straz, Jr. Center and it gives you a nice place to go and sit in the quiet under the stars after a stressful day of classes.”

Biggest surprise so far

“I met the love of my life in my Western Heritage class my second semester here. He happened to sit down next to me and we got around to talking. I never thought I would meet someone so soon, or in a class, but stranger things have happened I guess. It was a very happy and lucky surprise.”

What would your 8-year-old self think of you now?

“She would wonder why we aren’t going to become a veterinarian. Little did 8-year-old me know that she also would have to put down cats. But I think when I explained it to her, she would be happy. I’ve always loved the stars and science, and this is something I’m very happy I am doing. It doesn’t feel like work most of the time.”

Why should other students consider your major? What advice do you have for them?

“Physics is an amazing and difficult field of study. Engineering is not the only path for physics! You can do so much more and create so many things. You can learn to manipulate and interpret the world around you and it’s so much fun! I love studying the stars and why the universe is the way it is, and we have a planetarium here so that you can stargaze whenever you want. It’s a very challenging and interesting field, but I love it.”

“Try both the engineering aspect and the research aspect. We have the space science program that’s more for the engineering types. I discovered through building a satellite that engineering is not for me. Don’t choose this major if you don’t like it, because you will only grow to hate it from the challenge. It’s not easy, and if you think it’s easy in high school, well, that’s high school physics. That was easy. Physics is rewarding, but it’s not for everyone.”

Why Carthage?

“I chose Carthage because of the space sciences program here. I saw the program in an advertisement letter and I knew I wanted to come here. The professors are amazing and very dedicated to your learning. I also feel comfortable with the people I learn with. It’s a great atmosphere.”