Thomas Carr

  • Senior Scientific Advisor, Dinosaur Discovery Museum; Director, Carthage Institute of Paleontology; Associate Professor of Biology
    Email Address:
    tcarr@carthage.edu
    Office location:
    Straz Center 92
    Phone
    262-551-5887

    Thomas Carr’s research interests include the integration of ontogenic and phylogenetic data in paleontology, phylogeny and historical biogeography of Laurasian dinosaurs, and the craniofacial anatomy of archosaurs.

    He has named four new dinosaur species in peer-reviewed publications such as Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He is eagerly awaiting the Fall 2010 publication of his major review article on Albertosaurus sarcophagus, and he presently has three projects in progress that examine various aspects of the biology of Tyrannosaurus rex.

    Prof. Carr has appeared in the National Geographic Channel documentaries “T. rex Walks Again” and “Dinosaurs Decoded” that featured his scholarship and fieldwork on “T. rex.” He has written articles for popular publications such as Rotunda and Dinosaur World. He is currently working on “The Tyrant Lizards: The Reference Volume of Tyrannoauroidea,” an exclusive textbook for graduate students and vertebrate paleontologist. His degrees are Ph.D. Vertebrate Paleontology, Department of Zoology, University of Toronto; M.Sc. University of Toronto; B.A. York University (York, Ontario).

    Prof. Carr joined the Carthage faculty in 2004.

    • Ph.D. — Vertebrate Paleontology, Department of Zoology, University of Toronto
    • M.Sc. — University of Toronto
    • B.A. — York University (York, Ontario)
    • BIO 1010 Concepts in Biology
    • BIO 3330 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
    • BIO 4120 Senior Seminar in Biology
    • BIO 400T Topics in Biology: Dinosaur Evolution
    • BIO 6750 Dinosaurs (J-Term course)
    • Professor Carr also leads an annual month-long dinosaur-hunting expedition to southeastern Montana every summer. Carthage students have the opportunity to locate and collect fossils in the Hell Creek formation, a unit of rock deposited in Montana and adjacent states at the end of the age of dinosaurs. So far, Professor Carr and his crews have located four partial dinosaur skeletons, including a rare juvenile specimen believed to be the smallest T. rex ever found.

    Professor Carr’s research interests include:

    • The integration of ontogenic and phylogenetic data in paleontology
    • Phylogeny and historical biogeography of Laurasian dinosaurs
    • The craniofacial anatomy of archosaurs

    Every summer, he leads students in a month-long expedition to southeastern Montana. Students have the opportunity to locate and collect fossils in the Hell Creek formation, a unit of rock deposited in Montana and adjacent states at the end of the age of dinosaurs. So far, Prof. Carr and his crews have located four partial dinosaur skeletons, including a rare juvenile specimen believed to be the smallest T. rex ever found. Learn more about paleontology at Carthage.