Eric Pullin

  • Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies
    Email Address:
    epullin@carthage.edu
    Office location:
    Lentz Hall 320A
    Phone
    262-551-6323

    Professor Eric Pullin earned a B.A. in history from Rockford College, an M.A. in history from Northern Illinois University, an A.M. in Labor and Industrial Relations from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    Prof. Pullin’s primary teaching and research interests address the international relations between India and the United States during the 20th century. He also teaches courses on the History of India, the History of the United States, Western Heritage, Global Heritage, and the History of Dictionaries.

    Prof. Pullin joined the Carthage faculty in 2008.

    History professor Eric Pullin led students on a J-Term study tour to Europe in January 2016 to st...

    Media Mentions:

    Test your knowledge of the history of Labor Day
    Carthage College history professor Eric D. Pullin writes Labor Day history quiz.

    • Ph.D. — History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    • A.M. — Labor and Industrial Relations, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    • M.A. — History, Northern Illinois University
    • B.A. — History, Rockford College
    • HIS 1000  Issues in American History
    • HIS 200E Topics: History of India
    • HIS 2100 World War II
    • HIS 2200 Historical Methods: Cold War
    • HIS 2890 Nineteenth-Century America
    • HIS 3000 American Founding
    • HIS 3150 U.S. Diplomatic History since 1898
    • HIS 4000 Senior Seminar 
    • HIS 200E Topics: History of India
    • COR 1110 Intellectual Foundations II

    Eric Pullin’s primary area of research focuses upon international relations during World War II and the Cold War. More specifically, he is concerned with U.S.-Soviet-India foreign relations. In addition, he investigates transnational cultural conflict (for example, state-sponsored propaganda and the Congress for Cultural Freedom) and the activities of intelligence organizations. He has recently finished a book manuscript, “Noise and Flutter: Ideological Conflict between India, the United States, and the Soviet Union, 1942-1970,” which is currently under review.

    2011-2017
    
Jack Miller Center Grants: $2,000 or $3,000 annually for Constitution Day Speakers

    2016

    PNC Bank Community Foundation Grant: $10,000 to continue to continue Humanities Citizenship Initiative for high school students (in cooperation with Dr. Ben DeSmidt)

    Carthage College, Faculty and Research Grant for Sabbatical Travel to United Kingdom and Israel, $2,000

    2015
    
Harry and Lynde Bradley Foundation Grant: $75,000 to continue Humanities Citizenship Initiative for high school students (in cooperation with Dr. Ben DeSmidt)

    Charles G. Koch Grant: $7,500 for visiting scholars in HIS 3000 American Founding course

    Harry and Lynde Bradley Foundation Grant: $25,000 to establish a summer program in Western Heritage for high school students (in cooperation with Dr. Ben DeSmidt)

    2013
    
Council of Independent Colleges Grant: $12,000 to host Fellows Fumiko and Richard Halloran, as visiting scholars on the politics and culture of Japan, October 2013 (in cooperation with Dr. Art Cyr)

    2012

    Harry and Lynde Bradley Foundation Grant: $40,000 to continue program in Western Heritage for post-doctoral fellows (in cooperation with Dr. Ben DeSmidt and Dr. Joseph McAlhany)

    2011

    Harry and Lynde Bradley Foundation Grant: $50,000 to establish a program in Western Heritage for post-doctoral fellows (in cooperation with Dr. Ben DeSmidt and Dr. Joseph McAlhany)

    • “Quest: Twenty Years of Cultural Politics” in “The Ideological Cold War: The Journals of the Congress for Cultural Freedom,” edited by Giles Scott-Smith and Charlotte Lerg, (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
    • “Secrecy, State-Private Networks, and Operational Effectiveness in Cold War Europe,” “Contemporary European History” (Volume 25, Special Issue 3, August 2016)
    • “The Bandung Conference: Ideological Conflict and the Limitations of US Propaganda,” in “Neutrality and Neutralism in the Global Cold War: Between or Within the Blocs?,” edited by Sandra Bott, Jussi M. Hanhimäki, Janick Marina Schaufelbuehl, and Marco Wyss, (London: Routledge, 2016)
    • “The Culture of Funding Culture: CIA and the Congress for Cultural Freedom” in “Intelligence History Now and Then,” edited by Christopher Moran and Christopher J. Murphy, (Edinburgh/Columbia University Press, 2013)
    • “Money Does Not Make Any Difference to the Opinions That We Hold: India, the CIA, and the Congress for Cultural Freedom, 1951-1958, “Intelligence and National Security” (Volume 26, Numbers 2-3, April-May 2011)
    • “Noise and Flutter: U.S. Propaganda in India during World War II,” “Diplomatic History” (Volume 34, Number 2, April 2010)